How I grew my Business

Interview between Nick James and Ellie McKay

This interview really is all about how Ellie has built her expert profile and then used that expert profile to raise a fairly sizable amount of investor finance for her and her husband Mark’s property business.

So, I think the reason this is an interesting interview for me personally, is because most of the people that I interview, as you know, Ellie, are coaches, trainers, speakers, authors, they’re experts, mentors, that kind of crowd.

The below is a transcript from the interview with myself and Ellie.

Ellie McKay

"How I Grew My Business"

Business Mentor

Nick James:
Hey-hey, how you doing? Nick James here. What a phenomenal time to be alive. We are live on Facebook and also, for the first time ever, live on LinkedIn as well, with the amazing any Ellie Mckay. Thanks for joining us.

Ellie Mckay:
Hi. Thank you for having me.

Nick James:
So, I’m really excited about this evening’s interview. Here we are, Friday night, 8:30, Ellie has led by example, she’s shown up true to form with, looking fabulous of course, but also with a gin on the go. So, I thought, I can’t let her drink alone, that’d be a bit rude, so I’ve gone for a little cheeky ice-cold Heineken Zero, which is slipping down very nicely indeed.

Nick James:
So, this evening’s interview really is all about how Ellie has built her expert profile and then used that expert profile to raise a fairly sizable amount of investor finance for her and her husband Mark’s property business. So, I think the reason this is an interesting interview for me personally, is because most of the people that I interview, as you know, Ellie, are coaches, trainers, speakers, authors, they’re experts, mentors, that kind of crowd.

Nick James:
So, their revenue, their income for their business comes from selling products and services. And so what’s fascinating to me is that you’re not in that space at all, but still you’ve seen massive benefit from growing your personal brand, your expert profile. So, why don’t you start off, tell everyone tuning in here with us on a Friday evening a little bit about what you and your husband Mark do in your businesses, so fill us in?

Ellie Mckay:
Yeah. So, Ellie McKay, Combined Property, I’m the face of the business, Mark is the brains. He does all the real work. Mark’s got a couple of different businesses, we’ve got an electrical business and a fire protection business. We set up the property business two and a half years ago, and very quickly we realized the importance of the personal brand to leverage your company basically, because it’s …

Ellie Mckay:
The fundamentals really are … It used to be the old saying was, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know,” whereas we take it one step further than that really, “It’s who knows you,” because if people don’t know who you are, regardless of the sector that you’re in, then the door is not open to do business with you.

Ellie Mckay:
And I think when we look to … as you know, we’re a big fan of mentorship and Masterminds, whenever we are looking to master to a particular area, whether it be LinkedIn or whether it be a particular property strategy, we go to whoever we believe is the most qualified person to advise us on that. So, we had some quite high level LinkedIn training really and basically what it boils down to is people don’t want to be educated, don’t want to preached at, they want to know the person.

Ellie Mckay:
I think that’s been demonstrated time and time again, when you look at Richard Branson, as opposed to the following on Virgin, Elon Musk with Tesla, there’s just so many examples of where that works. And in the first instance, it didn’t particularly talk about property that much, it was just more people getting to know us.

Ellie Mckay:
And its got its pros and cons, just for full transparency, because to build a genuine following, you have to put yourself out there, and I’m not saying everyone has to do this, but if you want to build a personal brand, you’re going to have to stick your neck up above the parapet from time to time and voice your opinions. I’m pretty feisty, I don’t know if you’ve picked up on that.

Nick James:
I think anyone that follows you on social, on LinkedIn, would probably know all about your opinions and putting your neck on the line. And you do that a lot. And I think what’s important is that you do it in your way. So there’re various ways you can do that, you do it in your way. And look, the bottom line is what is building your profile? What is becoming known on social media? What it’s really about is attracting attention. And how do you attract attention? Well, you’ve got to do something, say something different to what everyone else is saying.

Ellie Mckay:
Yeah. In the early days I was … I think it’s Grant Cardone who says money follows attention, and there’s a lot of truth in that. But I think people, including myself, can sometimes just go out in the early days and make a lot of noise. But if you’re not making the right kind of noise, then you’re attracting a lot of the wrong attention.

Ellie Mckay:
So, as cheesy as it sounds, when you put out your authentic vibe, you get the right kind of tribe coming in. Like people used to say to me, “Oh, but Ellie you can’t swear on LinkedIn, this is a professional platform, save that for Facebook.” And I used to think, “Well, you can fucking swear on LinkedIn.” My intention is never to go out and offend people, and I think that’s the difference, it’s never to just go out and to use the F-bomb or whatever, just to disrupt.

Nick James:
For the sake it. It’s not for the sake of it. It’s doing it in times where it’s natural to you, I suppose.

Ellie Mckay:
Yeah. Precisely. And as much as that definitely repels people, that’s fine, because the nature of our business … And everyone has a purpose online, let’s be frank. I’m probably the least salesy person you’ll ever meet online. If you look at my content, there’s very few pitches, but it is also quite apparent hat we work with investors, that’s how we raise our finance for our projects.

Ellie Mckay:
So, for our business particularly, we’re looking for long relationships, we’re not looking for somebody to just source a property for, we’re not really operating at that level. So, my philosophy is, if someone’s offended by a particular post, as much as that’s not my intention, they probably wouldn’t be a right fit for the business to move forward in a long-term relationship.

Nick James:
Yeah. Yeah. I agree. And I think being a little bit disruptive, as you are, has certainly served you very well, clearly. So, what I want to get into now, if you don’t mind, is I think a lot of people … Let’s talk about LinkedIn, since that’s the place that you’ve really excelled and built your following and your profile and attracted a lot of investment from investors.

Nick James:
I’m going to just put it out there, I know I’m saying this and I’m live on LinkedIn, as I’m saying it, so I might come in for a bit of flack, but I personally don’t love LinkedIn. And actually the reason I don’t love LinkedIn as much as I love Facebook, is because a lot of time, as you just said, let’s face it, everyone’s got an agenda, everyone’s got a reason for being online, and we all do, no hiding away from that.

Nick James:
I do feel like LinkedIn, I’m going to sound a bit woo-woo when I say it, but the energy seems to be more get in the LinkedIn world, at least what I’ve observed anyway. So, I think the general feel, or the general vibe is request as many connections as you can in the field that you want to build an audience in, go for it, go play the volume game, the numbers game.

Nick James:
And then what most people do is just jump straight in and effectively ask to get married on the first date. They’re trying to make a sale in that first opening message. So, I think we can all agree that that is probably not the way to play the game. And a lot of people are doing that and it doesn’t really work, although it must work a lit bit, because otherwise why would so many people do it.

Nick James:
But it’s a numbers game and you’re probably not using the platform in the best way possible. My question really for you, Ellie, is, how, first of all, have you built the volume of following, and then part two of that question is, then what have you done to build a relationship with that following to attract investors?

Nick James:
And by the way, if you’re watching this and you’re not looking to attract investors, but you’re looking to get people to subscribe to your podcast, buy your book, buy tickets for your events, join your Mastermind, whatever the podium is you’ve got. Ultimately what you’ve done to build your profile, build the size of audience and the relationship, is what I’m quite curious to hear about.

Ellie Mckay:
Well, I’ve done a couple of things. So, LinkedIn is probably still my preferred platform, just. Just. I’m having a lot more fun on Facebook now. Instagram kind of lags behind, I just feel like I don’t really understand the platform, but I’m there for a bit of omnipresence. But with LinkedIn, I think there’s a lot of … It’s a very interesting platform, you get more shit on LinkedIn, you get more trolling on LinkedIn, you get attacked more on LinkedIn.

Ellie Mckay:
To say that it is meant to be the professional platform … At the start of lockdown, anyone who was trying to sell a product or service was a bastard. You were told you were a capitalist. I will not even say some of the other words. And it can be. And this is I think probably the same for all the platforms, it’s not native to LinkedIn. But you have to really take the good and try to disregard the bad.

Ellie Mckay:
I think that’s quite difficult for anyone starting out, that is lacking in confidence, that puts themselves out there, which can be a comfort zone stretcher, and you can get absolutely slated. But you’ve got to take the rough with the smooth, to the extent. I know it shouldn’t be like that.

Ellie Mckay:
Certainly at the start there was a lot of adding people, you know in business who your avatar is, this constantly evolves with a bit of getting to be yourself. We’ve recently raised the bar of our minimum investment amount, which really a lot of people are not [inaudible 00:10:41], because we don’t want to work with a lot of people, we just want to work with a select few high net worth’s.

Ellie Mckay:
I believe that there’s more money on LinkedIn, depending on what your product and service is. On Facebook, the inquiries we get are people who want us to source a property and generally speaking. But the other benefits, the other huge benefits … I’ll tell you a little bit about how I attracted the following I’ve got.

Ellie Mckay:
But one of the other benefits of any social media platform is the general brand building, and actually the main benefits are not … We raised £4 million off of LinkedIn in investment last year, but actually the reality is, in property terms, when you start, that’s not that much. But some of the other opportunities that came off the back of it have been priceless.

Ellie Mckay:
Getting asked to speak at events, connecting with people that are far further down the path, proper entrepreneurs, multi-millionaires, billionaires, to have some of the in-person meetings that we’ve had with some phenomenal people. To me, that is genuinely worth more than any amount of money in the bank. And people might think that’s bullshit, but that’s true.

Nick James:
Yeah. And also bearing in mind, what I just heard is, yes you raised four million in investor finance in the last year through LinkedIn directly, but also what you could never really measure is, but you got speaking gigs. And what value did that bring? It could have been additional investor finance and you didn’t attribute that to LinkedIn, it came from elsewhere.

Nick James:
And of course it could be that there were relationships that were built originally on LinkedIn and then you built them further in the live interactive world. And then they turned into investment relationships or they turned into partnerships. So, I think if that’s the place where you’ve started building your audience, great, but I think there’s a lot more …

Nick James:
You know, I’m doing a lot on different platforms now we’ve launched our own podcast, which has gone really well. And I almost half measure the value the podcast has created for my business, because it’s everywhere. It affects everything we do in a positive way. So, it’s hard to really attribute this source of audience in this amount of investment. So, let’s get into how many connections have you got on LinkedIn now?

Ellie Mckay:
I should have checked this properly before the interview. I’m sure it’s over 30,000. In the early days I was getting in the element of add, add, add. You know who your avatar is, you get your sales navigator and you can … Which is worth doing by the way, depending on what you’re trying to get out of LinkedIn. And it was a lot of blind dating.

Ellie Mckay:
You can restrict it. I know a lot of people that go into LinkedIn jail. I don’t know how, I’ve never been in LinkedIn jail. I think it is to do with the acceptance rate, so if you have quite a high acceptance rate, and I think I’m going to sound a bit sexist, but women tend to have a higher accepted rate, than men, so it could just possibly come down to that. But I stopped adding-

Nick James:
It probably is down, and I’m not an expert, but it’s probably down to how well you have targeted your avatar. And it’s probably down to whether your profile fits what … If you add someone and they look at your profile and they go, “This is completely irrelevant to me,” you’re probably not going to get a very high acceptance rate.

Nick James:
Whereas, if the people that you’re adding or connecting with see your profile and go, “That’s the kind of person I want to connect with,” you’re going to have a high acceptance rate. And, as you said, it might be a bit sexist, but maybe the fact that you’re female might give you a slight competitive advantage, I don’t know.

Ellie Mckay:
Who can say no to this face? But it’s funny, social media … I mean, it’s nuts, I stopped adding people when it got to 15,000, because there was no use to. And I know people that are getting a higher engagement than I’m getting even, with a lot less followers, so it’s not necessarily about how many followers you’ve got.

Ellie Mckay:
There can almost be a bit of ego in that, “Oh, I’ve got 30,000 followers,” It’s like, “Well, how many are you engaging, how many have you converted?” But I’ve just been approached, just the last couple of days, I’ve been asked to be on so many podcasts, from Facebook and from LinkedIn. I feel like the personal brand is really starting to go insane.

Ellie Mckay:
Like I’m being asked to … Our name’s getting on the map, and I couldn’t really have envisaged that. And with regards to social media, everyone’s got their own views on it and I appreciate that you can build a successful business without it, but nobody wants to, nobody wants to put themselves out there. And I spoke quite openly about this before two and a half years ago when I started posting on LinkedIn.

Ellie Mckay:
I had postnatal depression, and I had no confidence whatsoever. I was having anxiety attacks. I was two stone heavier than I am now. I had three young children. My youngest child was only five months old, I think, when I started in property. And it was a really tough time, our electrical business nearly went under in 2016.

Ellie Mckay:
So I understand, like when people say, “Oh, it’s all right for you, Ellie, you’re super confident and things.” That’s something that I had to work with every single day. And public speaking and things like that, I fucking hate that shit, I hate it. But if you say to me, “Right, Ellie, the vids are back on, do you want to headline Expert Empires?”

Ellie Mckay:
I’d be like, “Yeah, absolutely.” I’d be like, “No problem, I’ll be there.” I’ll get off the phone and I’ll just be like, “Oh, my God.” But you’ve just got to level up. So, when people say, “I don’t want to do it,” I just need to urge it. And as well, people starting out in at your property journey, there’s nothing wrong with posting online, just be authentic, don’t make out that you’re something that you’re not, I think that’s key.

Ellie Mckay:
You can position yourself as an authority figure. If you’ve got knowledge, you can share your knowledge or you can just entertain your audience or you can get your own personal brand out there, without insinuating or lying that you’ve done a lot more than you have done.

Ellie Mckay:
Whereas, Mark, my husband, he’s the operational guy, and he’s the one that project manages the project managers, he deals with the brokers, the solicitors, the accountants, and stuff like that. Mark, if it were down to him, we would have no online presence at all, he’s always supported me with it, but I don’t know if he truly understood the value until the investments started coming in.

Ellie Mckay:
Whereas, if we’d had waited until … I think it’s a bit of a mindset thing, a lot of people want to wait until they feel that they’ve done enough. But what is enough? Because all I see now, and I know to a lot of people, they perceive … And I’m very proud of our achievements, but as far as I’m concerned we’ve just been laying the foundations, we’re only just getting started now, there are projects we’re about to get stuck into. That’s leveling up. So, if we’d have waited for that …

Ellie Mckay:
But again, that relates to you guys, there’s a lot of heat I suppose on the wealth creation space at the moment, and the right business coaches and right mentors and things like that. At the end of the day, I’m not a trainer, I’ve got intentions of being a trainer, but I can only speak from my own personal experience.

Ellie Mckay:
I’m in two high-level Masterminds, one of which is obviously with yourself. And when I speak to people sometimes and they’re like, “Well, how much did it cost and how much have you got back?” It’s so difficult to quantify the support and the value you get from being around a room full of high achievers or people that are far further on, because I scraped into your seven figure Mastermind.

Ellie Mckay:
And some of the guys in that room are just doing some phenomenal stuff. And I think there’s almost an element of, putting aside the content, I think there’s almost an element, for me, with Masterminds of a bit of a pay to play, because I thrive. I’ve got no qualms about saying I thrive around people that are further down the path that I want to travel, have more experience than I’ve got, more spend. I just love listening to that level of chat. So yeah, I went off on a bit of a tangent here, but I think I-

Nick James:
I’m glad you noticed that, because I wasn’t going to mention it, but yeah. Bit of a tangent, really valuable, I think. So, let me bring you back on track, so I want to know, you said that you built up to about 15,000 connections on LinkedIn, really through adding, more like what most people probably learn about growing a profile on LinkedIn.

Nick James:
It then, by the sounds of it, organically grew from 15,000 to 30,000, because you were posting good content and you were getting engagement. I guess, my question is maybe a little direct, but how did you take an audience of people on LinkedIn, there’s plenty of people out there that have got a load of connections on LinkedIn, but how did you turn those connections into relationships, to the point that you could have somebody invest money in projects with you, to partner with you?

Nick James:
That’s not like I’m trying to sell a five, 10, 15 quid product here, this is like you’re really developing real deep relationships, to the point that the trust is so great they’ll invest with you. So how do you move people from, I’m connected with you on LinkedIn, to I’m actually partnering with you and investing at a high level?

Ellie Mckay:
Well, people watch, I call them lurkers, because pretty much … Well, when somebody makes an investor inquiry with us on LinkedIn or Facebook or what have you, first thing to do is just have a little scroll down my news feed and just see if they’ve engaged with any of my content, and 90% haven’t.

Ellie Mckay:
I think with LinkedIn in particular, generally when we get the inquiry now it’s, “Ellie, I’ve been following you for six months, 12 months.” Sometimes more than that. My first question is, “Why don’t you like my posts?” I’m going to make that a prerequisite now. But yeah, I think it’s that whole know and trust.

Ellie Mckay:
And the reality is there’re hundreds of property and investors out there that are … What do they call them? What do they call themselves? Property investment strategist or whatever it is, and they’re all offering results of X, Y, and Z. I think people want to see longevity. They want to know that you can stay the distance, they want to know their money’s safe ultimately, and they want to know you.

Ellie Mckay:
For example, if we can an inquiry through our website, it’s a very different conversation, but generally by the time people reach out on LinkedIn, it’s kind of a done deal, they’ve waited, there’s just a particular post that’s triggered them. They’ve been watching in the wings and they want to work with Ellie and Mark specifically.

Nick James:
Right. So, a tactical question then, how direct or not are your posts on LinkedIn about like, “Here’s the process, if you’re interested in investing with us here’s what you need to do.” How direct or not are you with that?

Ellie Mckay:
Every LinkedIn trader in the world is just going to be going, “No.” I find these posts quite spammy myself. I suppose I only do posts that I believe are true to me. I know why I’m on LinkedIn, so maybe if I’m putting out a post of a particular project, I might reference the fact that this was purchased using investor finance on a fixed return basis. Occasionally I might, if this is something …

Ellie Mckay:
You know what’s interesting, I have done these direct posts, I’ve been like, “Investors looking to to invest in property, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, send me a DM.” And they just bomb. I would not get any inquiries. But then when I would just put a post out like, “Just sourced 10 HMOs, which we’re not doing by the way, so if you are an HMO, please don’t DM me. “Just got 10 HMOs secure, all with a 16% yield, you don’t get returns like that.” Then, boom, no DME, nothing like that and then your inbox would just go nuts.

Nick James:
And people do it anyway. Well, you know our approach, my approach, when it comes to sales and in our industry there’s a lot of, especially in events, direct selling, do this now, you must buy, you’ll get this discount, these extra bonuses, go to the back of the room and get your credit card out. And I suppose the way that I sell is probably not dissimilar to the way that you position what you do on LinkedIn.

Nick James:
The way I like to think of it is, it’s always there in the background, people know that I run Masterminds. People know that you take investor finance, invest it in projects, give fixed returns at a healthy rate. People know you do that, you talk about it all the time, but you never go in, “Give me your money,” in the same way that I’m never from the stage going, “Run to the back of the room now, you’ve got to do it.”

Nick James:
I’m not playing that game. I don’t want to play that game. And I don’t think the audience, the market wants to be around that anymore, don’t think they ever did, but there wasn’t much choice. And so I think what we’re probably seeing, and this wasn’t where I was expecting this conversation to go, what I think we’re seeing is a real shift in the buying behavior or you might call it investor behavior.

Nick James:
Where, for me, it’s more about people making their own decision about when they want to invest and then moving towards you as the provider, rather than me trying to get, convince, persuade you to do things with me. I think that’s the shift that I’ve experienced in events. And I think you’ve found the same on social media with investors.

Ellie Mckay:
You need to be the lighthouse. You need to be the beacon and people know where you are, you shine bright, I’m the property girl, you’re the events guy and that was one of the reasons I gravitated towards you guys at Expert Empires, because I was already in a high level Mastermind specific to property and I had no intentions of signing up to another one.

Ellie Mckay:
But listening to you delivering the value without pitching, but making an offering and being told, “This is what the price is. This is the product and the service. And this is where we’ll be if you want to chat about it.” Because I tell you something, I don’t like being condescended, I don’t like to be told to go to the back of the room like some sort of moron. I am shocked that that still washes with people. And you know my views on all that kind of stuff.

Ellie Mckay:
And this is why I speak out so passionately by appropriate training, about mentorship, because there’s so much shit on the industry, and a lot of it is justified. There’s some great people out there, doing some great stuff. And yeah, I think if people want to continue to sell their courses with a seven on the end … I’m not saying if you do that you’re dodgy, I’m not saying that.

Ellie Mckay:
But I just think people need to move with the times and the old Annie Oakley tactics, they don’t work we’re all wise to them. But certainly my approach is, I love to buy, but I need to be sold to. So, that’s who I am and I’ve got to be true to myself. And yeah, I could probably get a lot more investment. But at what cost? My integrity is more important.

Nick James:
Yeah. I think what you’re a great example of, and obviously this is how I do things, and also how we train our clients as well to take a similar approach really. The stages, and of course they apply differently on social media or in events or elsewhere, is first of all, whatever content you’re putting out, whether it’s video on social, whether it’s in a live event or an online event, as I run, the first thing you’ve got to serve, you’ve got to give something of value, you got to educate.

Nick James:
And sometimes serve in your case is making a ballsy statement that’s going to to open people’s eyes and disrupts a little bit. That’s still a serve. I think the step a lot of people miss out, which I do a lot of, is what I call seed. So seeding the facts, which you do brilliantly on social, that you have investors that work with you and you find the deals and you do all the leg work.

Nick James:
Seeding the fact that I have Mastermind programs, I’m always talking about it, but I’m never ramming it down your throat. I think that’s the distinction. And so serve and seed are first two parts of it. And what happens once you’ve done serving and seeding, is people can then, if they resonate with your message, they can move toward you.

Nick James:
And when they move towards you, now they’re saying, “Yes, hello, I’m interested.” They’re asking for information, in other words they’re asking to be sold to. There’s nothing wrong with selling to people- [crosstalk 00:28:44]

Ellie Mckay:
Exactly.

Nick James:
… because people love to buy. So, it’s like, “Hey, I’m interested in investing with you, Ellie, or I’m interested in joining your Mastermind, Nick.” “Right, here’s all the information you need, we’ve got it all written out in a nice brochure, we’ll give it you.” And say, “Right, there’s all the info, what questions have you got?”

Nick James:
And then if it’s apparent that it’s a good fit for them, for us, then we will, unapologetically we will ask for the money, because you’ve got to sell and close, if you’re going to do business. So I think there’s that … Again, this wasn’t where I expected this conversation to go, but I think it’s important-

Ellie Mckay:
It’s very important.

Nick James:
… if people will take anything, from me at least, from this, I think the more you can serve and seed, serve and seed, serve and seed, use social for that. If you’re running online or offline events, serve and seed like crazy, as much as you possibly can. So that really the interested people will come to you and then they’re asking for information, you can sell and close. And it’s easy then.

Ellie Mckay:
Yeah. Can I just say on that point as well, Nick, because I think another thing, I am going to get a little bit woo-woo here, I think all this personal development is going to my head, but I think you need to have … You know, since we had our chat, so I was at Nick’s Mastermind in Birmingham. When was it, yesterday? Was it yesterday or the day before?

Ellie Mckay:
Anyway, we have a fantastic day. One of the things that we discussed was me leveling up, not working with some of the … just work my higher net worth clients. And since then I’ve actually turned down two clients. And there’s something quite empowering about that, not because you want to … Because we’re talking about selling, because you want to sell it, whether it be Mastermind, whether it be tickets for events, and in my case inventors.

Ellie Mckay:
It’s making sure that you work with people that are genuinely a right fit for your business as well, and not putting the person with the money. And I see this every single day, people put the person with the money on the pedestal.

Ellie Mckay:
And I just don’t think that’s putting the right vibes out to the universe, because it’s got to be a mutually ben- it’s got to be a win-win for everybody. And I certainly think if you get the person with the money all the power, you’re almost degrading yourself somewhat.

Nick James:
Wow. That’s deep. That’s pretty strong words I think. And I certainly agree with you, to a certain extent, where money is … We can get really woo-woo on this. For me, it’s like this thing that causes people to do all sorts of weird shit they wouldn’t normally do. It causes people to get really uncomfortable in a conversation. It causes people to go into this weird, as I often call it, get energy.

Nick James:
I’m sure a lot of people that do the kind of work you do, similar investors, that raise finance, they go into get energy and try and take as much investment as they can. And there’s plenty of people in our industry that are the same. People have weird and wonderful relationships with money. And I think as soon as money comes into play, people often do change in terms of how they operate.

Nick James:
And so, for me, getting your mindset around that right, is what you were alluding to I think, is crucial. And for you right now to be able to say, “You know what, I don’t need that investment that badly. You’re not a right fit. I’m setting myself that I’m only going to work with investors at this level,” that’s really powerful. And I think that word will spread, that that’s how you operate.

Nick James:
And especially, you’re primarily on LinkedIn, I think people on LinkedIn will realize that actually, “Hey, if I’m going to work with Ellie, if I’m going to invest with Ellie, I need to be operating at a certain level and I’ve got to be a certain type of person.” And that’s really powerful.

Nick James:
So, I’m aware of your time, 35 minutes has flown by here this evening. So, first of all, I suppose it might be worth me asking this question for your benefit. If somebody’s interested in potentially talking to you about investing with you, how would they get in touch with you, Ellie?

Ellie Mckay:
Social media. Yeah. Drop is a DM on LinkedIn or on Facebook. I’ll not give you my email address, I’m terrible at checking my email, I’ve got somebody who does that for me. But probably best through LinkedIn or Facebook.

Nick James:
Perfect. Amazing. So, listen, thank you so much for your time this evening. It’s now gone nine o’clock, so I’ll let you get off and enjoy the start of your weekend. Congratulations. I think I have to say congratulations on your huge success, both you and Mark. I love you guys. You’re amazing. I’m so, so thrilled to be part of your journey and see your growth personally and professionally, and the amazing results that you’re getting now in the business as well. So, congratulations on all of that long, long may it continue.

Ellie Mckay:
Thank you very much.

Nick James:
Thanks for joining us. Thanks everyone for tuning in this evening, on a Friday evening. And if you joined this late, I’m on the alcohol free beer, because Ellie was on the gin I thought I can’t let her drink alone. So, I cracked open an alcohol-free beer. So, have a great evening, Ellie, and everybody else who’s tuned in.

Nick James:
Thank you so much. Carrie’s just commented and said, “This is the third time this week I’ve heard the words woo-woo with Nick. Maybe the universe is telling you there’s something in it. There you go. So thanks everyone for tuning in. As always, as I like to say, remember the more you connect, the more you collect.

Ellie Mckay:
Bye everyone.

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